This image shows the main street through Pauatahanui Village.

EARLIER PAUATAHANUI VILLAGE PLANNING

This page describes the Village Planning Programme partnership between Porirua City Council and the Pauatahanui community to improve their village. It outlines work carried out prior to 2012.

To find out about the latest village planning work in Pauatahanui go the main Pauatahanui page.

To find out more about the Village Planning Programme go to the home page.

On this page you will find:

 

Looking back on first stage of Pauatahanui Village Planning work

In the first stage of work carried out during 2010:

  • Vegetation was cleared back and trees "lifted" on the stretch of footpath between the General Store and Rushes Restaurant,
  • Rushes Restaurant's northern sign and fence has been shifted back from to the pathway to provide better sight lines along the footpath,
  • Speed humps to slow traffic through village centre have been installed,
  • The footpath linking Pauatahanui and Whitby has been cleared and gorse removed from the planting areas,
  • Pedestrian access areas have been clearly defined over the Old Pauatahanui Bridge and its link to Whitby,
  • Clean up of broken and dangerous woodwork around the General Store,
  • Removal of redundant armco barriers and replacement with sight rails,
  • Renovation of pathway outside the cinema,
  • Ornamental lights in the village have been repaired and are now working.

Rotary took ownership of the project to clean-up and plant a garden bed near the pedestrian crossing to the school, which is now complete. See photograph below.

This photograph shows the Pauatahanui garden area upgraded by Rotary as part of an ongoing village centre revamp.


This photograph shows the Pauatahanui garden area upgraded by Rotary as part of an ongoing village centre revamp.


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Volunteers go extra mile for Pauatahanui Pathway

This photograph shows George Williamson (left) and Philip Reidy, of the Plimmerton Rotary Club during work to extend the Te Ara Piko - Pauatahanui Pathway - in April 2011.

This photograph shows George Williamson (left) and Philip Reidy, of the Plimmerton Rotary Club during work to extend the Te Ara Piko - Pauatahanui Pathway - in April 2011.

The Rotary Club of Plimmerton won the Recreation Volunteers Award at the 2011 Encore Awards for its work in creating Te Ara Piko.

And Porirua City Council was highly commended in the Excellence in Compliance section for minimising impact on the environment during its construction.

The awards, announced in December 2011 reward people going the extra mile to restore, protect and enhance nature and history, and enable others to enjoy it.

The Rotary Club of Plimmerton campaigned for years to encourage the Council to include the pathway in its long term plan, and partnered with the Council to bring its vision to fruition.

Club members advocated for the pathway, and acted as project ambassadors, promoting it at festivals, organising revegetation plantings and establishing their own nursery.

The Te Ara Piko pathway runs along the northern edge of Pauatahanui Inlet through native salt marshes and wetland habitat. It currrently stretches 1.8kms but the intention is for it to eventually ring the inlet.

The joint project between Plimmerton Rotary Club and the Council received a funding boost in 2010 from the Walking Access Commission who granted the Council $30,000 over two years toward the project.

In early 2011, the pathway was extended another 200m around the shores of Pauatahanui Inlet to Ration Point.

You can view more photographs and information. (3 page word document)

 

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Pauatahanui's historic sites

Pauatahanui still contains a number of historic sites recognised by the Historic Places Trust.

Among them is the Taylor Stace Cottage (pictured below), which is believed to be the oldest residence in the Wellington region.

It has been restored in a joint project between the private owners, Porirua City Council and The Historic Places Trust. The work has involved moving the cottage and putting it back on raised foundations to protect it from floods. While the cottage was off its foundations an archeological dig was carried.

The cottage now houses the Lavendar Room Beauty Spa. To find out more visit the company's website www.lavenderroom.co.nz.

This photograph shows a view of the historic Taylor Stace cottage in Pauatahanui before restoration began.

The photograph above shows a view of the historic Taylor Stace cottage in Pauatahanui before restoration began.

The photograph (below) shows restoration almost complete in May 2011.

This photograph shows restoration on the Taylor Stace cottage almost complete in May 2011.

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Heritage roses and historic burial ground

This photograph shows Volunteers Sharon Evans and Rosemary Patterson walking among the Heritage Roses at Pauatahanui.

Volunteers Sharon Evans and Rosemary Patterson walk among the Heritage Roses at Pauatahanui.

Historic roses on show

The project to clear the overgrown and neglected Burial Ground site adjacent to the Historic Church of St Albans and to plant Heritage Roses was the vision of 5 local Pauatahanui women in 1991.

With the help of friends and families, the first area was ready for planting in 1992. The bulk of the roses were grown from cuttings, others were donated.

Over the years a notable collection has been built up of mainly older varieties and working parties are held several times a year with local residents and members of Wellington Heritage Roses and the Mana Branch of the Wellington Rose Society, taking part. Porirua City Council also helps maintain the area.

The best time to visit the Burial Ground is from late October, November and December for peak flowering but roses can be found flowering for many months of the year.

The cemetery at Pauatahanui dates back to 1856, when Thomas Hollis Stace donated an acre to the community for a burial ground. Early settlers to New Zealand brought rose cuttings with them from Britain and when a family member died, often planted a rose by their grave. The tradition dates back to the early days of Christianity.

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